Claim Your Story

Writing Conference, Ashland, Oregon


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The most important things are the hardest to say

love writing in the sandThe most important things are the hardest to say. They are the things you get ashamed of, because words diminish them — words shrink things that seemed limitless when they were in your head to no more than living size when they’re brought out. But it’s more than that, isn’t it? The most important things lie too close to wherever your secret heart is buried, like landmarks to a treasure your enemies would love to steal away. And you may make revelations that cost you dearly only to have people look at you in a funny way, not understanding what you’ve said at all, or why you thought it was so important that you almost cried while you were saying it. That’s the worst, I think. When the secret stays locked within not for want of a teller but for want of an understanding ear.” (Stephen King)

Image by Billy Tice, Austin, TX


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Midge Raymond on Naming Characters

Midge Raymond has excellent advice on naming your characters. You can find her blog here. Romeo and Juliet–classic examples. Romeo and Juliet statueMidge will be teaching a workshop on marketing and will also take part in a panel on branding at Claim Your Story II, October 4.

 

 


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Reminder: October 5 is the final day to receive room discount

If you’re attending the conference and don’t live in the Ashland area, please make your reservations at Lithia Springs Resort by Friday, October 5 to receive the discount.

The place is incredible–restful and lovely and filled with small thoughtful touches that make your stay more enjoyable. Jay and I are looking forward to our third stay there.

Be sure to mention “writer’s workshop” to receive your discounted rate.

Thanks,

Jessica

LSR-May-bloom920


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Registration is now open for Claim Your Story 2014

October 4, 2014

Lithia Springs Resort, Ashland, Oregon

And here’s a nugget for you:

“Stars were the first text, the first instance of gabbiness; connecting the stars, making a pattern out of them, was the first story, sacred to storytellers. But the moon was the first poem, in the lyric sense, an entity complete in itself, recognizable at a glance, one that played upon the emotions so strongly that the context of time and place hardly seemed to matter.” – Mary Ruefle starry-night

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