Claim Your Story

Writing Conference, Ashland, Oregon


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Q & A With Midge Raymond

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Q: What is your best writing tip?

A: My best writing tip is to Write Every Day — and by that I don’t necessarily mean sitting at the computer typing but being in that writerly zone in which you use every possible moment to think about your project. While in line at the post office, for example, think about your characters, think about a letter she might write, think about a time he got someone else’s mail. There are so many moments in which we’re not able to write, but we can still be thinking like writers.

Q: Is writer’s block real? If so, how do you tackle/circumvent it?

I think it’s real for some writers, and probably nonexistent for others. When I find myself getting stuck on a piece, I try a couple of strategies. One, I’ll simply switch to something else; as a short-story writer, I usually have several short stories in progress. If I want to stick with a particular piece but am not getting where I need to go with it, I’ll take a break and do something related to the project: research, freewriting — or I’ll simply take a walk and think about it away from the desk, which always helps.

 Q: What’s your writing process?

A: It changes every day — I have no typical process because for me there’s no such thing as a typical day (which generally I think is a good thing!). For a while last winter, I got up before dawn to write; lately I’ve been writing in the afternoons at the library. It all just depends on when I can fit it into my schedule. One thing I’ve enjoyed a lot is getting away from my desk and writing in a notebook — being off the computer helps me get into a more creative mood.

Q: How do you make time to write?

It’s my biggest challenge! I make sure to take some time off every year to get away (out of town) to write — this is the best way to reconnect with my writing. I’ll also try to re-create this writing time at home, in my everyday life — a couple hours here, a Saturday there — whenever I can.

A: What are you working on next?

Right now I’m working on about six new short stories … all in various stages of development.

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Midge Raymond on Naming Characters

Midge Raymond has excellent advice on naming your characters. You can find her blog here. Romeo and Juliet–classic examples. Romeo and Juliet statueMidge will be teaching a workshop on marketing and will also take part in a panel on branding at Claim Your Story II, October 4.

 

 


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Midge Raymond

MidgeRaymond-photoI’m happy to announce that Midge Raymond will be teaching two workshops at Claim Your Words.

You can follow Midge at her site.  You will also find a link here to her blog where she covers topics related to writing and reading and posts writing prompts. And if you haven’t read her article in the latest issue of Poets & Writers “My Book Is a Year Old, Now What? How to Keep the Buzz Alive”, I recommend it.  Here is a link.

Midge Raymond is the author of the story collection Forgetting English, which received the Spokane Prize for Short Fiction. Originally published by Eastern Washington University Press in 2009, an expanded edition was published by Press 53 in 2011. She is also the author of Everyday Writing: Tips and Prompts to Fit Your Regularly Scheduled Life, and the companion title Everyday Book Marketing. Her award-winning stories have appeared in TriQuarterly, Bellevue Literary Review, the Los Angeles Times, and many other publications.

 


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Midge Raymond answers questions about the writing life

MidgeRaymond-photo     Q: What is your best advice for writers in 20 words or less?

     A:Write what you love, and don’t worry about the market for your work until you’re    finished writing.

     Q:What inspires you?

     A: The world around me has always been my biggest inspiration —it’s an endless source of material,and I’m endlessly curious about human beings and what makes them tick. Paying attention is what leads me to story ideas, and it’s also where I get fuel for the emotions behind the writing, for example, by witnessing something either troubling, or beautiful, or bizarre.

Q: Where is your favorite place to write?

B: My very favorite place to write is the Whiteley Center on San Juan Island, where I did a residency last year. I got more work done there in ten days than I had throughout the entire year. Otherwise, I’ll write anywhere; it’s finding the time that’s my challenge! I love to take a notebook somewhere, like Lithia Park, to explore the beginnings of a story. When I’m at the end, in a revision stage, I like to print everything out and go to a cafe with my pages and a red pen. Otherwise I’m happy if I can find the time to sit on the sofa or at the kitchen table with my laptop.

Q:How do you see the future of publishing?

A: I am very optimistic about the future of publishing. Despite all the disruptions to traditional publishing, there are also wonderful new opportunities that allow self-published authors and small presses to thrive.

For more insights and inspiration from Midge visit her here.


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Writing tip: Read and write in equal proportions.

statue readingThere are so many rules out there about writing, thousands of books written by thousands of experts. Some contradict—outline, write by the seat of your pants. Write what you know. Don’t write what you know. Write for yourself. Write for the market. Never edit as you go. Never use fragments, never use run-on sentences. Never write in second person. Avoid first person. Never write in present tense.
My suggestion when it comes to sorting through the cacophony: Don’t follow other people’s rules or advice without questioning them. Some really smart people offer really bad advice and the internet is swarming with self-proclaimed experts.

When it comes to the writing life and success here’s a tip that especially helps beginning writers: Read and write in equal proportions.

There are so many things reading teaches us—the most important is how we should slow down and savor the author’s language and words for their raw power. It teaches us the impact of individual sentences and how we can build them to tumble out of control, meander, or stop us short with their brief and startling brilliance. We learn the many options available for viewpoint and distance and how a character’s voice rings true. Reading teaches us how to choose a few painstaking details to paint large canvasses. Sometimes it’s the exact color of an object, or a character’s bath robe, or a particular song convincing us of the story’s truth.

Or, we notice how an anecdote woven amid a larger world lends it veracity. Or, how small gestures whisper volumes about a person or betray the unconscious. For example, in Amy Bloom’s short story “Silver Water”, I’ve never forgotten how Rose at 15 is exhibiting the first signs of schizophrenia and her psychiatrist father doesn’t want to believe it is happening even as Rose begins licking the hairs on her forearm, first one way, then the other.

Close reading teaches us how to use ordinary moments to ground a reader in a fictional reality or the memoirist’s past. By dissecting the page you can observe how a writer implants tension in a scene.

While carefully reading dialogue we learn how regional expressions create authenticity and a sense of place; how characters sometimes hide their true thoughts and feelings; how dialogue can be a sort of choreography when difficult subjects are at hand; and how a character’s simple or poetic speech patterns create credibility for a living, breathing being.

Read from a questioning frame of mind. Ask yourself about the choices the writer made. Would you have done it differently? Why did the author stage a scene in a designer or use a particular word or set the story in December?

As for the advice about reading bad stories for a frame of reference–I don’t buy that logic. Save your precious reading hours for authors who inspire you.

 


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Registration is still open

 

Registration is still open for  Claim Your Story Writing Conference

April 12, 2014

Lithia Springs Resort, Ashland, Oregon

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“It’s hard to remember that this day will never come again. That the time is now and the place is here and that there are no second chances at a single moment.”
Jeanette Winterson


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Hotel discount closes on Friday, March 28th

I chose the Lithia Springs Resort as the site for Claim Your Story because it’s beyond charming and comfortable.  Mineral springs piped into a sweet bungalow is a slice of heaven in my opinion. It’s situated among gardens heavy on the wisteria and blooms and winding paths. So serene and inspiring.  We’ve also come to enjoy the professionalism of the staff and how they help with every conference detail and serve delicious food.  Please contact them to reserve your place for a discounted rate.

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Back in the day, this was called Jackson Hot Springs.

Jackson Hot Springs